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Archive for August, 2011

PRAYER REQUEST

Please pray for Postulant Julie Black, a postulant sister at Divine Compassion House, our Convent in Warsaw, Indiana.  She had a significant accident today.  Her right femur is broken in about 3 place just above the knee.  The is to have surgery early Wednesday.  She also have a number of signficant scrapes, bruises, and gouges.  Pray that God will guide the hands of the doctors, and that she recover quickly.

Fr. Greg

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Training for Alpha small group leaders and helpers will be held again this Wednesday, 31 Aug, following Family Prayer at CoH. Come to the training even if you missed last week. Your presence is not a commitment. Thanks!

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Hey, everybody, Pat Prenger and Deanna Brown are excited about Alpha. Pat spoke to the congregation on Sunday saying that his experience of Alpha is fun: fun fellowship, fun talks, fun discussions – a great way to spread the Good News. That’s why he’s excited about Alpha. Deanna Brown is also excited about Alpha. She spoke directly to the teens in the congregation saying she is excited because it’s an opportunity to invite friends she hasn’t seen in a while and she hopes to fellowship with them, renew friendships, and maybe even encourage some of them to explore Christianity more deeply. Are you excited about Alpha?

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Just a gentle reminder that we will have Sunday School available for all ages tomorrow.  At the Adult Forum, we will have a final recap of all that we learned during a study of St. Paul’s Letter to the Galatians.  We will begin a new study that will start 4 September 2011.  More about that tomorrow.

Last week’s Gospel told us the story of St Peter’s confession of faith in Jesus Christ.  We will now consider what kind of genuine Christian life that such a confession of faith looks like.

I look forward to seeing you at Church!

Fr. Greg

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Hello church,

JoAnn Roberts is asking for prayer for those in the path of Hurricane Irene. Fred and JoAnn and another good friend Ron and Betsy Bishop live in Newport News, VA. The eye of the Hurricane is predicted to pass just 30 miles away in Danbridge, VA.

JoAnn said that her family has lots of supplies and just expects to have no electricity for a while. She hopes that the nearby creek don’t rise!

Karla H.

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Hi,

This Sunday OSU students will be performing – Erin Rea and Sonnets on the Shortwave. These performers are good friends of Rachel Herman. Come and enjoy a nice evening of music and fellowship. All are invited over to Greg Herman’s house afterwards for s’mores and hot dogs and fun!

Karla H.

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Today we remember St. Louis, King of France and Patron Saint of the Franciscan Third Order Secular.

COLLECT FOR ST. LOUIS

O God, who called your servant Louis of France to an earthly throne that he might advance your heavenly kingdom, and gave him zeal for your Church and love for your people: Mercifully grant that we who commemorate him this day may be fruitful in good works, be given the grace to follow in his footsteps and those of our Seraphic Father, St. Francis; and attain to the glorious crown of all your saints; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

THE LIFE OF ST. LOUIS

Louis was born in 1214 and became King of France when twelve years old. His mother, the half-English Blanche of Castile, was regent during his minority, and an influence while she lived. In 1234 he married Margaret of Provence, sister of Eleanor the wife of Henry III of England (no, not the couple from A Lion in Winter–that was Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine: this is two generations later).

Louis worked for the political unification of France, yielding Limoge, Cahors, and Perigeux to Henry in exchange for Henry’s renunciation of all claims to Normandy, Anjou, Maine, Touraine, and Poitou (Treaty of Paris, 1259). He yielded French claims to Rousillon and Barcelona in exchange for the yielding of Spanish claims to Provence and Languedoc (Treaty of Corbeil, 1258). He largely eliminated the feuding and wars among French nobles and vassals that had ravaged France before his time. He protected vassals from oppression, and required their lords to fulfill their obligations. He reformed the system of taxation. He reformed the courts, so that every man in France, regardless of his station, had a far better chance of receiving justice than had previously been the case. He promoted the writing down of the law, so that it was clear what the laws were, and made major strides toward eliminating trial by combat in favor of trial by jury. (Trial by combat decided the guilt or innocence of the accused by a combat between the accused and the accuser, either personally or by proxy, with God being called on to uphold the right. Trial by ordeal required the accused to prove his innocence by, for example, walking across a bed of hot coals. Both were hold-overs from pre-Christian Frankish Law, and were vigorously denounced by many clergy, but took a long time to die out.) His reputation for integrity was such that foreign monarchs regularly asked him to arbitrate their disputes.

He founded a hospital for the poor, sick, and blind, known as the Quinze-Vingts (the Fifteen Score, originally for 300 inmates). His reign co-incided with the great era of the building of Gothic cathedrals in France. Robert de Sorbon, the founder of the Sorbonne (University of Paris) was his confessor and his personal friend, and Thomas Aquinas was a frequent guest at his table. (Once, it is said, Thomas dropped out of the conversation, lost in thought, and then suddenly struck the table with his fist and exclaimed, “That is a decisive argument against the Manichees!” Louis at once called for writing materials, so that Thomas could record the argument before he had a chance to forget it.)

Death of Louis in Tunis, from an illuminated mauscript of the history of FranceHe fought in two Crusades, both of which were total failures. In 1248 he led an army to the island of Cyprus, and was there joined by 200 English knights. In 1249 they proceeded to Egypt and took the city of Damietta, but discipline broke down and Louis was unable to keep the soldiers from looting. Disease ravaged the camp, and in 1250 the army suffered a disastrous defeat at Mansurah and Louis himself was taken prisoner. His Arab captors were quick to recognize in him a mixture of military valor and personal holiness, and were accustomed to kneel when speaking to him. He and his handful of surviving companions were released on the surrender of Damietta and the payment of a large ransom. He sailed to Palestine, visited the few Holy Places that were accessible, and returned to France in 1254. In 1270 he joined another crusade, which landed in Tunis, where he immediately caught typhoid fever and died on 25 August. His biography, by a friend and comrade in arms, the Sieur Jean de Joinville, is available in English in Chronicles of the Crusades, Penguin Paperbacks.

***http://satucket.com/lectionary/Louis.htm***

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